To Understand the Printmaking Process of My Embossed Pieces

Design and Cut the Plate

Step One
Design and Cut the Plate

Step 2

Step 2
Here’s what a finished plate would look like.

Step 3

Step 3
My Printing Press

Step 4

Step 4
After the paper is torn to size and soaked, I place it on the plate and pull the press bed through the rollers using the large wheel.

Step 5

Step 5
Pressure forces the image into the paper. Here is a finished print without gold or color accent.

Step 6

Step 6
Highlighting the image begins with painting the special gold leaf sizing where I gold leaf to be placed.

Step 7

Step 7
Gold leaf comes in a “book” with each “leaf” being unique. There are no two leafs alike nor books alike. The leaf is membrane thin. I place the sheet over the area I’ve applied the sizing to. Later, I brush away the gold that has not adhered to the sizing. Yes, it has taken years of patience and practice.

Step 8

Step 8
The print is now ready to clean up and sign.

Step 9

Step 9
Not a creative step, but necessary. This is my well worn mat cutter. I spend days and weeks cutting mats and shrink wrapping each print individually, by hand.

 

2 Responses to To Understand the Printmaking Process of My Embossed Pieces

  1. chris says:

    I purchased two of your works in Oklahoma City a few years ago

    612/950 Horses Running

    798/950 Freedom & Faith can you tell me alittle history of the making of the two and an approx. Insurance value… Is the gold used in the Feather real gold? I also have another smaller art piece made by you a pair of cowboy boots next to a flower, has no name or number but I love it as well!!! Thanks Chris

    • admin says:

      Hi Chris. Thanks for contacting me. It’s been a while since I did the show in Oklahoma City. Horses Running and Freedom and Faith have been sold out for some time. The feather does have gold leaf. It’s not the 24k gold but does have some gold, dyes, and other metals beat into the leaf. Both of those pieces would be valued at or around $90 unframed. The little cowboy boots were an open edition and would be valued at $25.

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